Contributors

for July/August 2011

  • Zubair Ahmed was born and raised in Dhaka, Bangladesh. In 2005, he and his family won the DV lottery and received the opportunity to emigrate to the U.S. He now studies mechanical engineering and creative writing at Stanford University.
  • Skylaire Alfvegren is the founder of the League of Western Fortean Intermediatists (forteanswest.com), which explores the mysteries and peculiarities of the American West. She lives in Los Angeles. Further dementia can be accessed at Skylaire.com.
  • Rae Armantrout’s book Versed won the 2010 Pulitzer Prize for poetry. A new book, Money Shot, was published by Wesleyan University Press this year. Armantrout teaches writing at U.C. San Diego.
  • Marshall Brown is an architect, urban designer, and former resident of Brooklyn. Now based in Chicago, he hopes to design the Barack Obama Presidential Library. He is currently working on scenarios for the future of Chicago as a center of the world.
  • Alvin Buenaventura publishes comics and books with Pigeon Press.
  • Tom Zé will perform at Lincoln Center in NYC on Tuesday, July 19, at 8 p.m. A vinyl-only box set, Studies of Tom Zé: Explaining Things So I Can Confuse You, was released in 2010, along with the stand-alone CD release of Estudando a Bossa. The documentary Tom Zé: Astronauta Libertado allows viewers a look into Tom’s life and music through personal reflection, archival images, and input from other Brazilian musicians, and won the Audience Award for Best Foreign Documentary at the São Paulo International Film Festival.
  • Frances Cha is the Seoul editor of CNNGo, the entertainment, travel, and lifestyle division of CNN. She teaches creative writing at Yonsei University.
  • Paul Collins teaches creative nonfiction at Portland State University. He is the author of seven books; his latest, The Murder of the Century, has just been published by Crown Books.
  • Meagan Day is a musician and a student at Oberlin College. She was born and raised in Texas and lives in San Francisco, though she plans to return to school in Ohio shortly after the publication of this issue.
  • David Givens lives in Chicago. He has, for nearly three years, been attempting to write an essay for this magazine about a medieval painting that moved him. He apologizes for the delay.
  • Daniel Handler writes books under his own name and as Lemony Snicket.
  • Nick Hornby lives in North London.
  • Hua Hsu teaches at Vassar College. He is completing his first book, A Floating Chinaman.
  • Rozalia Jovanovic is a founding editor of Gigantic and the deputy editor of Flavorpill New York. Her essays and fiction have appeared in VICE, the New York Observer, BlackBook, Unsaid, and Guernica.
  • Greil Marcus is the author of Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the Twentieth Century, Mystery Train: Images of America in Rock ‘n’ Roll Music, and The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice, and other books. His column, Real Life Rock Top Ten, runs monthly in the Believer.
  • Davia Nelson is one half of The Kitchen Sisters, producers of the NPR series Hidden Kitchens, Lost & Found Sound, and the Sonic Memorial Project. Their current NPR series is The Hidden World of Girls.
  • Jack Pendarvis has written three books.
  • Eileen Reynolds is a freelance writer and bassoonist living in New York. She frequently contributes to the New Yorker’s Book Bench blog and has also written for publications including Symphony, the Forward, and Fourth Genre.
  • John Roderick is the singer/guitarist of The Long Winters. He’s written for MSNBC, CMJ, the Stranger, and the Seattle Weekly, and a book of his tweets, Electric Aphorisms, was published by Publication Studios in 2010. Follow him on Twitter @johnroderick.
  • Ronnie Scott is the editor of an Australian magazine, The Lifted Brow (theliftedbrow.com), and is working on a book called You’ll Never Wake Up, about how people learn to be adults.