Contributors

for June 2011

  • Jesse Ball was a poet and novelist of the late twentieth and early twenty-first century. His work is internationally known and has been both praised and censured. This year, two new works appear: The Curfew (Vintage) and The Village on Horseback (Milkweed Editions).
  • Alvin Buenaventura publishes comics and books with Pigeon Press.
  • Hillary Chute, an English professor at the University of Chicago, is the author of Graphic Women: Life Narrative and Contemporary Comics (Columbia University Press, 2010), and associate editor of Art Spiegelman’s MetaMaus, forthcoming from Pantheon in the fall.
  • Benjamin Cohen is the author of Notes from the Ground: Science, Soil, and Society in the American Countryside (Yale University Press, 2009) and a number of other academic and non-academic writings triangulating around science, the environment, and culture.
  • Millicent G. Dillon’s “In the Atomic City” is adapted from her recently completed memoir, The Absolute Elsewhere. Her previous books include biographies of Jane and Paul Bowles, as well as the novel Harry Gold, a finalist for the PEN/Faulkner Award.
  • Toph Eggers is a screenwriter in Los Angeles. He is also the coauthor of the Haggis-on-Whey series of faux science books for kids, most recently the forthcoming Children and the Tundra.
  • Misha Glouberman is a performer, facilitator, and artist who lives in Toronto. He hosts Trampoline Hall (a barroom lecture series of nonexperts), runs conferences, puts on participatory sound events for nonmusicians, and teaches classes in negotiation, charades, and other subjects.
  • Nick Hornby lives in North London.
  • Doogie Horner is a writer, stand-up comedian, and graphic designer. He is the author of Everything Explained Through Flowcharts, and his writing has also appeared in Wired, Fast Company, and The McSweeney’s Joke Book of Book Jokes.
  • Robert Ito has written for the Village Voice, Salon, and the New York Times. He lives in Los Angeles with his wife, Hyunu, and his son, Ezekiel.
  • Adam Mansbach is the author of The End of the Jews, winner of the California Book Award, and the best-selling Angry Black White Boy. His children’s book, Go the Fuck to Sleep, will be published in October. It should not be read to actual children.
  • Greil Marcus is the author of Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the Twentieth Century, Mystery Train: Images of America in Rock ‘n’ Roll Music, and The Shape of Things to Come: Prophecy and the American Voice, and other books. His column, Real Life Rock Top Ten, runs monthly in the Believer.
  • Jack Pendarvis has written three books.
  • Megan Pugh is a PhD candidate in English at UC Berkeley. Her writing has appeared or is forthcoming in Denver Quarterly, FLYP, the Oxford American, and Web Conjunctions.
  • Tag Savage is a designer and illustrator. He lives in New York City.
  • Natalie Shapero’s poems have appeared or are forthcoming in Conduit, the Kenyon Review, Poetry, Smartish Pace, and elsewhere. She lives in Chicago.
  • Charity Vogel, a native of Buffalo, is at work on a book about the Angola Horror train wreck of 1867 (forthcoming from Cornell University Press). She and her husband and two daughters live in an 1898 Victorian home in western New York. She has worked in journalism for fourteen years and enjoys researching historical subjects.
  • Lawrence Weschler is the author of over a dozen books, including Mr. Wilson’s Cabinet of Wonder (about the Museum of Jurassic Technology in L.A. and other such wonder cabinets); Everything That Rises: A Book of Convergences; and, forthcoming this fall, a new collection, Uncanny Valley and Other Adventures in the Narrative (Counterpoint Press).
  • Annie Julia Wyman is a graduate student in the Department of English at Harvard and a member of the National Book Critics Circle. Her reviews and essays have appeared in the San Francisco Chronicle, the Threepenny Review, and elsewhere.